local – hipflask

Posts Tagged: local

POW Negro

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As far as gigs go, this one was probably the nicest smelling one I have attended.

I don’t know where it came from really. I don’t know if it was the lady’s shampoo I was standing near or if someone was burning some incense in an art room or whether I am just slightly unhinged… but god damn it smelt like musk Lifesavers and it was so great.

So pair this with the comforting ambiance of Fremantle Arts Centre and a night that’s slightly colder than perfect and BAM you have got a good time.

Oh yeah, the music.

Henry Kissinger – the better one – is surprisingly cool. He’s probably my new favourite keyboardist (sorry Ray Manzarek) thanks to his bass fueled loops and beats that make me dance quite good without having to think about it too much.

Ziggy’s performance is astounding. I love Hip Hop. A lot. Discovering a new local artists I can listen to at home and follow throughout their career is why I keep going to gigs really. That and the exercise I guess. So give these guys a listen if you like your breakbeats and flows. Ups to JCAL as always, as well.

POW Negro hardly need an introduction sentence anymore. If you live in Perth you’ve probably already witnessed their wondrous live performance; theatrics, musical instruments and now these amazing visuals, and well if you live anywhere else, you can’t claim to be the music connoisseur of your mate group unless you know these guys, sorry.

On this particular Friday night, the gang was launching their single ‘Money for Portraits.’ The song in its self is a banger. Not just because its catchy but because its arranged nicely. The verses have great lyrics, the bridge is a highlight and really pumps you up for the riff driven chorus.

When I said musical instruments before I wasn’t just drawing attention to the fact this band plays instruments (shocking, I know) but more that Pow! Negro are a breed of artists that interchange the composition and roles of their members frequently.

This reminds me of A – The Beatles and B – the struggle millennials are facing to get a job; no one’s going to look twice at you soon unless you bring that little bit more to the table.

The drummer sings, the guitarist plays drums, there is a saxophone, singing and rap intertwine, there is dancing, banter and so on and so forth. I love it, but also am exhausted by the dynamics, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

I guess the band it’s an accurate representation of life. Without stating the obvious, we all know art is a perception of society so what I am trying to say here is Pow portray feelings of the community on a small scale and humanity on a global scale well, which is ah kind of necessary, but a bit deep for a single launch review.

I existentially wonder what is next for music. I love the hybrid everything that seems to come with conscious human evolution condensed into one lifetime, but also still love simple well-though out compositions. Really, I don’t know what I want and I am sure you don’t either but that being said we can figure it out together. Something to look forward to in this post-truth world.

As an audience member and a music consumer I can kind of tell that each member is bringing their own vibes to the table behind the scenes and then as a band they pick up what’s good and work on something from that – obviously beautiful cooperation.

It really is ‘Zac de la Rocha-ish,’ but to be honest I’m sick of people comparing them to Rage Against the Machine. Like that’s accurate but lazy and they’re so much more.

They’ve nailed the funk, the melody and the jazz. Next up I would love to see more slow jams. They already have one or two – check out Sam | Saim on Soundcloud – which they pull off well.

RacketBall goes off as always and when performing ‘Hidle Ho’ they are joined on stage by Ziggy and MC Marley which made everyone smile. Trust me, I genuinely looked around and took note and everyone had their pearly whites on show.

A lot of their music is still not available online, or rather has been quite scarce in the past but with their Big Splash 2016 win, hopefully we will see more recordings pop up on the World Wide Web.

So anyway, that’s enough tangents from me – to wrap it up, can’t wait for the EP.

The Tommyhawks

The Tommyhawks are a bunch of ladies responsible for some of the catchiest riffs around and what I believe to be one of the best titled EP’s of our time –

We’re All Meat and We’re Gonna Get Eat.

They’re launching their second EP at Jack Rabbit Slims tonight with Rag N’ Bone and HYLA and lucky for you, with any purchase of Hurling Stones and Sticks you get BOTH EP’S (woohoo).
So have a gander of this chat we had with their delightful lead singer Addison Axe, chuck on some of their recommended tunes while you have pre’s and head into town (great plan).

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How did ‘The Tommyhawks’ come to exist?
We all met 2 years ago at The WA museum. We just clicked instantly, despite coming from totally different musical backgrounds and as a result have learnt a great deal from each other.

We’re pretty excited for your EP release tonight, tell us a bit more about that. Where did the name ‘Hurling Stones and Sticks’ come from?
The title is a line from the song Safe House. We’ve spent a lot of time on the road, living in a van together over the past year and that has had a huge impact on our dynamic and a the way we write and work together and it’s been an exciting process putting all that into this EP. We were really lucky to be able to crowd-fund this too, and the feeling that people have so much faith in us is inspiring. The songs on this EP are more personal and intimate than on our first one, so I feel quite vulnerable putting it out there, but we’ve had so much support with the first single Hollow it’s humbling.

What are some local acts you would recommend checking out?
Rag n Bone
Galloping Foxleys
Yokohomos
King of The Travellers
Child Saint


Lets end with a difficult question, what are your Top 5 Albums of all time?
Neil Young: Harvest
PJ Harvey: Stories from the City Stories from the Sea
Police: Outlandos D’Amour
Ani Di Franco: Knuckle Down
Patti Smith: Horses

Support Structure

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It will be a sad day when Free Range Gallery closes its doors later on this year, so we really encourage you to check out some of the local talent they’re showcasing over the next few months and experience this unique space while you can!

Running until Saturday, Support Structure is an exciting exhibition of new works by Liam Colgan (WA), Emma Schrader (WA) and Grace Herbert (TAS). Examining the artists shared interests in built environments; the show will consider the ways in which these spaces have the ability to influence their occupants.

Drawing inspiration from three very distinct spaces: the gallery, bedroom, and construction site, Support Structure highlights the unseen mechanisms of our built world. Through multi-media installation Colgan playfully explores how the environments we live in can subtly shape our identities. Schrader uses sculpture to sensitively examine how the human body can connect and relate to the space it occupies. Herbert’s photographic installation seeks to investigate the transient nature of built spaces.

This project is supported by the Department of Culture and the Arts.

Good Company Records

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Hipflask sat down with Andrew Sinclair (Sinco) the legend from Good Company who, with his partners Nik and Perri, have just launched Good Company Records to compliment their already established record store and promotion work.
We chatted about the essentials and the development of Perth’s cultural identity

I remember back in the day when I knew you as the drummer from Erasers. What was your first foray into the local music scene?
Erasers actually grew out of the first band i played in, Shock! Horror! The name says it all really. We we’re very young, very naive & way too ambitious. Like all first bands i guess. I don’t play in Erasers anymore but they are still making music and it is some of the best music right now.

Are there particular pieces of technology that you favour when it comes to making and distributing music?
When it comes to making music the ear, mind & soul are still the most essential technologies. If those things are working together in harmony then you can make magic out of anything, with anything. And when it comes to distributing music, it’s obviously very easy to push music far & wide with things like soundcloud and bandcamp, which are essential for any self promoting musician, but good word of mouth is key! If you can get good people talking about your shit, you’ve got it made.
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Good Company has hosted and co-hosted some of the most enjoyable parties in Perth over the last few years. How are you guys likely to split your time between putting on gigs and producing recordings?
It’s pretty simple actually, just people power. Nik Patterson is the man responsible for making the parties what they are, alongside Jack Faulkner of The Monarchy, who we collaborate on with le Club. Perri Basile holds it down at the record store, which leaves me to focus on the label. We all contribute ideas and work to all aspects of the biz, but when you boil it down that’s how we are doing it and keeping all 3 things as good as they can be.

What would you like to see happen in the local music industry or the music industry as a whole, to compliment the work you’re putting in?
There’s lots of little things I would like to see happen but the basic goal is to enrich the cultural identity of this city through the power of music. That means helping people be more open-minded, helping artists understand where they fit in this world, helping them develop their own musical identity, then trying as hard as you can to take their art to the rest of the world.
I also want to make sure the people here get to enjoy musical experiences rich & unique to us as a people.

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Check out their Hugo Gerani, their debut artist to sign to the label.

Paradise Circus

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‘Paradise Circus,’ an exhibition by Matt Wright, is a dizzyingly beautiful arrangement capturing the female figure within an accurate portrayal of life – enigmatic and passionate.

Using different blends of acrylic, charcoal and graphite, urban landscapes lurk in the background of a poolside daydream as we are invited to wistfully surrender ourselves to this world of utopia of chaos.

Created with strong lines but defined with wistful expression of powerful colour these somewhat personal representations entice us into a voyeuristic lull and wake us up with harsh, obscure text –  purposely open-ended to invite the viewer to draw their own conclusions of the narrative.

Matt exudes the skill of a weathered artist after only painting for a year and a half. This exhibition forms the first public display of his work as a visual artist.

At The Bird. Now showing until the 3rd of May. Check it.